Tag Archives: California foreclosures

Foreclosure Activity Up 53% Over June 2007

Default notices, auction sale notices and bank repossessions were reported on 252,363 U.S. properties during June 2008, a 3 percent decrease from the previous month but still a 53 percent increase from June 2007, according to the latest RealtyTrac Foreclosure Market Report.

The report also shows that one in every 501 U.S. households received a foreclosure filing during the month.

“June was the second straight month with more than a quarter million properties nationwide receiving foreclosure filings,” said James J. Saccacio, chief executive officer of RealtyTrac. “Foreclosure activity slipped 3 percent lower from the previous month, but the year-over-year increase of more than 50 percent indicates we have not yet reached the top of this foreclosure cycle. Bank repossessions, or REOs, continue to increase at a much faster pace than default notices or auction notices. REOs in June were up 171 percent from a year ago, while default notices were up 38 percent and auction notices were up 22 percent over the same time period.”

Nevada, California and Arizona continued to document the three highest state foreclosure rates in June.  Florida, Michigan, Ohio, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana and Utah were other states that made the top ten.

For the third month in a row, California and Florida cities accounted for nine out of the top 10 metropolitan foreclosure rates among the 230 metropolitan areas tracked in the report.

RealtyTrac noted that “Foreclosure filings were reported on 8,713 Nevada properties during the month, up nearly 85 percent from June 2007, and one in every 122 Nevada households received a foreclosure filing — more than four times the national average.”

“One in every 192 California properties received a foreclosure filing in June, the nation’s second highest state foreclosure rate and 2.6 times the national average.”

“One in every 201 Arizona properties received a foreclosure filing during the month, the nation’s third highest state foreclosure rate and nearly 2.5 times the national average. Foreclosure filings were reported on 12,950 Arizona properties, down less than 1 percent from the previous month but still up nearly 127 percent from June 2007.”

“Foreclosure filings were reported on 68,666 California properties in June, down nearly 5 percent from the previous month but still up nearly 77 percent from June 2007. California’s total was highest among the states for the 18th consecutive month.”

“Florida continued to register the nation’s second highest foreclosure total, with foreclosure filings reported on 40,351 properties in June — an increase of nearly 8 percent from the previous month and an increase of nearly 92 percent from June 2007. One in every 211 Florida properties received a foreclosure filing during the month, the nation’s fourth highest state foreclosure rate and 2.4 times the national average.”

“Foreclosure filings were reported on 13,194 Ohio properties in June, the nation’s third highest state foreclosure total. Ohio’s foreclosure activity increased 7 percent from the previous month and 11 percent from June 2007. The state’s foreclosure rate ranked No. 6 among the 50 states. Other states in the top 10 for total properties with filings were Arizona, Michigan, Texas, Georgia, Nevada, Illinois and New York.”

“Seven California metro areas were in the top 10, and the top three rates were in California: Stockton, with one in every 72 households receiving a foreclosure filing; Merced, withone in every 77 households receiving a foreclosure filing; and Modesto, with one in every 86 households receiving a foreclosure filing. Other California metro areas in the top 10 were Riverside-San Bernardino at No. 5; Vallejo-Fairfield at No. 7; Bakersfield at No. 8; and Salinas-Monterey at No. 10.”

“The top metro foreclosure rate in Florida was once again posted by Cape Coral-Fort Myers, where one in every 91 households received a foreclosure filing — fourth highest among the nation’s metro foreclosure rates. The foreclosure rate in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., ranked No. 9. LasVegas continued to be the only city outside of California and Florida with a foreclosure rate ranking among the top 10. One in every 99 Las Vegas households received a foreclosure filing in June, more than five times the national average and No. 6 among the metro areas.”

“Metro areas with foreclosure rates among the top 20 included Phoenix at No. 12, Detroit at No. 13, Miami at No. 15 and San Diego at No. 17”

RealtyTrac does not expect foreclosure activity to ease up until 2009.

Chronology of Home Price Declines in Orange County — Median Home Price Now Lowest Since March ’04

We found this chronology of the decline in median home prices in Orange County, California, showing a $179,000 decline in single family home prices from its high in June 2007:

Single Family Median Home Price:

2006 ~ Monthly

$690,000 = Feb
$695,000 = Mar
$705,000 = Apr
$705,000 = May
$700,000 = Jun
$699,000 = Jul
$685,000 = Aug
$680,000 = Sep
$665,000 = Oct
$660,000 = Nov
$665,000 = Dec

2007 ~ Monthly

$675,000 = Jan
$675,000 = Feb
$695,000 = Mar
$720,000 = Apr
$695,000 = May
$734,000 = Jun — Peak of O.C. Housing Bubble
$718,000 = Jul
$710,000 = Aug
$655,000 = Sep
$650,000 = Oct
$655,000 = Nov
$600,000 = Dec

2008 ~ Weekly ~ Monthly

$600,000 = 01/07
$595,000 = 01/15
$595,000 = 01/23
$583,250 = Jan
$585,000 = 02/07
$575,000 = 02/13
$575,000 = 02/22
$575.000 = Feb
$580,000 = 03/07
$575,000 = 03/14
$567,000 = 03/20
$570,000 = 03/26
$570,000 = Mar
$553,750 = 04/08
$565,000 = 04/14
$563,000 = 04/22
$550,000 = 04/28
$555,000 = Apr

The most recent DataQuick stats from April 2008 show a $500,000 median selling price. 

The last time median home prices were this low in Orange County was March 2004.

Perhaps even more disturbing: nearly four out of every 10 homes sold in Southern California last month was a foreclosure.

 

Eleven State Foreclosure Prevention Group Slams Lenders and Bush’s New Hope Alliance — Says Not Enough Being Done to Help Homeowners

In the summer of 2007, the Attorneys General of 11 states (Arizona, California, Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas), two state bank regulators (New York and North Carolina), and the Conference of State Bank Supervisors formed the State Foreclosure Prevention Working Group to work with servicers of subprime mortgage loans to identify ways to work together to prevent unnecessary foreclosures. 

The Working Group has now issued two reports, in February 2008 and April 2008, based on data collected from subprime mortgage servicers. 

The reports note that foreclosure prevention continues to fall short, despite widely-publicized campaigns to encourage homeowners in trouble to seek help and initiatives by servicers to fast-track loan modifications.

The major findings of the State Foreclosure Prevention Working Group include the following:

  • 70 percent of homeowners who are two months behind on their mortgages still aren’t getting help and are still not on track for any loss-mitigation.
  • While the number of borrowers in some kind of loss mitigation program has increased, it has been matched by an increasing level of delinquent loans; thus, the relative percentage has remained about the same. “This large gap suggests a systemic failure of servicer capacity to work out loans.” 
  • Only one in three delinquent borrowers completed a workout within 45 days.  Slow assistance is partly why the number of homeowners facing foreclosure increased 16 percent.  Servicers’ loss-mitigation departments are severely strained in managing the current workload.  “We are concerned that servicers overall are not able to manage the sheer numbers of delinquent loans…the burgeoning numbers of delinquent loans that do not receive loss-mitigation attention are clogging up the system on their way to foreclosure…We fear this will translate to increased levels of vacant foreclosed homes that will further depress property values and increase burdens on government services.”
  • Homeowners who do receive loss-mitigation help are most likely to receive some form of loan modification.  Such modifications are a solution that seems to offer better long-term prospects for successful resolution of problem loans. Many servicers are replacing their use of repayment plans in favor of loan modifications.
  • The Hope Now Alliance — a coalition of mortgage lenders and servicers backed by the Bush administration — has not provided borrowers with very much hope.

Based on their findings, the State Foreclosure Prevention Working Group made the following recommendations:

  • Develop a more systematic loan work-out system to replace the intensive, individual, “hands-on” loss-mitigation approach. “Initial efforts to develop systemic approaches are far too limited to make a difference in preventable foreclosures. Without a systematic approach, we see little likelihood that ongoing efforts will make a serious dent in the level of unnecessary foreclosures.”
  • Slow down the foreclosure process to allow for more work-outs. “Targeted efforts to slow down subprime foreclosures may give homeowners and servicers more time to find solutions to avoid foreclosure.”

“Progress is being made, but there is a long way to go,” said Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller, a founder and leader of the State Foreclosure Prevention Working Group. “We still see a tremendous gap between the need for loan work-outs and the options in place today.”

“Foreclosures are costly, further reduce real estate values, and harm not only borrowers, but also neighborhoods and communities,” said Massachusetts Attorney General and Working Group member Martha Coakley.  “In most cases, and particularly where mortgage loans contain payment terms that were not structured to be sustainable in a real estate downturn, loan modification and other loss mitigation should be done much more actively.”

We would point out that the states involved in the Working Group have nearly half of the nation’s electoral college votes — and that several of these states are crucial “swing” states in the 2008 presidential election.  The candidates need to pay close attention to the Working Group’s findings and recommendations.

 

Michael Jackson’s “Neverland” Rescued by Colony Capital

Foreclosure was front page news again today, but not the kind based on subprime loans to people who can’t afford them.

In this case, the foreclosure (almost) happened to ’80s pop star and (alleged) child rapist Michael Jackson.  The property is Jackson’s famous 2,500 acre Neverland Ranch, just outside of Santa Barbara, California.

According to press reports, Jackson owes $24.5 million on Neverland to Financial Title Company, and can’t pay.  The foreclosure auction for the ranch was scheduled for this week. 

Jackson was bailed out today by an investment company that purchased the loan.

We think that the company that bailed out Jackson by purchasing the loan — Colony Capital LLC — made an excellent deal.

The folks who run Colony Capital are exceptionally smart investors, and the Neverland deal fits perfectly with Colony Capital’s philosophy of “cautious contrarianism.” 

As they explain on their website, Colony Capital “employs the entrepreneurial investment strategy which has been successfully executed over the past sixteen years. This strategy is designed to consistently achieve attractive risk-adjusted returns by minimizing competition with other capital sources, while maximizing value through intensive post-acquisition management.”

“Three themes define this strategic approach:

  • Cautious Contrarianism during downturns or secular changes, investing in out-of-favor sectors or markets to exploit capital or product misalignments
  • Exploitation of Inefficiencies capitalizing on information advantages to identify micro-market imbalances and secure investments on favorable terms 
  • Value-added Management to Optimal Exits creating capital appreciation opportunities through repositioning, restructuring, development, and intensive management.”

Both Jackson and Neverland will no doubt benefit from Colony Capital’s “repositioning, restructuring, development, and intensive management” efforts.

Michael Jackson himself is certainly improperly managed and “out of favor.” 

And no doubt misaligned as well.

For those of you who haven’t been to the Neverland Ranch area, take it from us that it is amazingly beautiful, and is certainly worth far more than Jackson owes, especially with proper management.

We also like this remark from Colony Capital’s Founder, Chairman, and CEO Thomas J. Barrack, Jr.  

In an interview with the French magazine Paris Match, Barrack explained the financial crisis that has followed the bursting of the U.S. housing bubble as follows: “Confidence has disappeared because no one knows any longer who owes what to whom, or what it’s worth. It’s as if toxic waste had been sold in cans with ‘gold’ printed on the lid.”

We wish we’d said that.

 

 

Mortgage Fraud Scammers Plead Guilty in US Foreclosure Capitol

Stockton, California, has been hit harder by the subprime mortgage crisis than any other US city. 

With a population of just over 280,000, Stockton had 22,000 foreclosure filings in 2007 (1 in 27 households), the highest foreclosure rate of any city in America. 

And as home prices continue to fall, the foreclosure crisis in Stockton is getting worse.

Stockton was an agricultural community, the seat of San Joaquin County, the fifth largest agricultural county in the United States and one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world.  In the past decade, however, Stockton experienced a population boom due to thousands of people settling in the area to escape the higher cost of living in San Francisco and Sacramento. 

Although the median income for a household in Stockton was only $35,453, the per capita income for the city was only $15,405, and 18.9% of families and 23.9% of the population were below the poverty line, subprime loans made houses in Stockton available to thousands who had very little income.

Home construction boomed, house prices soared, and subprime loans kept expanding the bubble further and further. House flippers, speculators and subprime lenders made millions.   

Then, in 2007, the bubble burst.

Few people were more active in profiting from the booming subprime housing market than a young immigrant from Pakistan named Iftikhar Ahmad. 

Between 2003 and 2005, Ahmad made millions of dollars buying and selling more than 100 homes and other properties in the Stockton area.  His company, I & R Investment Properties, LLC, was thriving.  Ahmad deposited at least $8.6 million from escrow closings and was able to send at least $484,000 back home to his native Pakistan.

Ahmad purchased a home at 327 N. Pilgrim Street in Stockton in 1997 for $22,000, then sold and repurchased the same property twice before ultimately selling it a third time in 2005 for $236,000. A house at 2228 E. Stadium Drive in Stockton was bought by Ahmad for $99,000; just 18 months later, he sold the house for $330,000.  In another series of transactions, a house bought and resold several times by Ahmad appreciated in value more than tenfold over an eight-year period.

It sounds like Iftikhar Ahmad was a very smart real estate investor.

The trouble was that Ahmad’s real estate empire was built on fraud.

On October 25, 2007, Ahmad was indicted on federal charges of mail fraud and money laundering, and on April 28, 2008, he pled guilty in federal court to mortgage fraud. 

Ahmad admitted that from July 2003 through October 2005, he participated in a scheme to defraud Long Beach Mortgage, a wholesale lender, in connection with the sale of 10 residential real properties. Between July 2003 and January 2005, Ahmad, through I & R Investment Properties, fraudulently sold 10 residential real properties, obtaining in excess of $1.5 million in loan proceeds.

In each of these transactions, the purchaser financed the property with money borrowed from Long Beach Mortgage.  The scheme involved the use of straw purchasers who lent their name and credit to real estate transactions in which they in fact had no interest. The scheme also involved false statements on loan documents, including those that related to income and occupation, and undisclosed payments by Ahmad of the down payment on behalf of the purchasers.

Many of the mortgages came from subprime lenders and in some cases the buyers used stolen identities. 

And in many of the real estate transactions, the buyers defaulted within a year.

In addition to Ahmad, three other defendants in the scheme have also pled guilty.

John Ngo, 27, of San Ramon, California, a former Senior Loan Coordinator for Long Beach Mortgage, pled guilty to perjury for falsely stating in testimony before the grand jury that he had not received money from a mortgage broker who referred borrowers to Long Beach Mortgage, including borrowers involved in transactions with Ahmad, when in fact he had received more than $100,000 from the mortgage broker.

Manpreet Singh, 24, of Stockton, California, entered a guilty plea to mail fraud for acting as a straw purchaser and borrower in connection with two properties that she purchased from I & R Investments in late 2004 and early 2005. She further admitted that Ahmad paid her in excess of $22,300 for her participation in the scheme.  The properties went into foreclosure within months of the purchase.

Jose Serrano, 44, of Stockton, California, pled guilty to a single count of mail fraud. As part of his plea, Serrano admitted that Ahmad had paid Serrano to recruit straw purchasers, and that Ahmad and Serrano caused several other purchasers to be paid for participating in the scheme.

The case against Iftikhar Ahmad and his co-conspirators was brought by US Attorney McGregor W. Scott, who also indicted mortgage fraud scammer Charles Head

Scott said: “This prosecution begins to bring into focus the ways that fraud occurred in the subprime lending market in the Stockton area in the 2003 to 2005 time frame. False representations were made in loan documents; down payments were secretly made by the seller on behalf of borrowers; buyers and recruiters were paid to participate in the scheme; and a loan coordinator working for a wholesale subprime lender was paid by a mortgage broker handling the transactions. The investigation continues.”

Singh’s sentencing date is set for June 9, 2008.  Sentencing for Ahmad, Ngo, and Serrano is set for July 14, 2008.

 

 

Seasonal Boost in Southern California’s Home Sales Lowest in 20 Years — Median Home Prices Continue to Fall as Foreclosures Rise

According to DataQuick, “The onset of spring did little to thaw Southern California’s semi-frozen housing market: The seasonal boost in sales between February and March was less than half its normal level and a record low.”

The data shows that 12,808 new and resale homes and condos sold in Southern California Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, Riverside, Ventura, and San Bernardino Counties in March. 

Although that figure was 18.8 percent higher than the 10,777 sales reported in February, it was down 41.4 percent from March 2007.

In addition, while DataQick’s statistics show an average seasonal increase of 38 percent in sales between February and March for the last 20 years, the 18.8 percent increase for March 2008 was the lowest seasonal sales boost in DataQuick’s records, which go back to 1988.

As expected, the data showed a continued increase in foreclosure resales and a decline in median sale prices.

More than one out of three Southern California homes that resold last month, nearly 38 percent, had been foreclosed on at some point in the prior year.  Last year such sales were only 8 percent of the market.  At the county level, foreclosure resales ranged from 28.8 percent in Los Angeles County to 56.4 percent in Riverside County.

The median price for a Southland home last month was $385,000, the lowest since $380,000 in April 2004. Last month’s median was down 5.6 percent from February’s $408,000, and down a record 23.8 percent from $505,000 in February 2007.

Significantly, the psychology of the current real estate market is creating its own downward drag on prices, as potential sellers are waiting for the market to hit bottom and potential buyers are waiting for prices to fall further. 

DataQuick president Marshall Prentice explained: “We continue to believe a lot of people who could be buying or selling right now are opting to sit tight until they sense we’ve hit bottom. Often what we’re left with, especially in inland areas, are sales driven by foreclosure or the threat of it.”

Here’s what we know:

Those who can hold on to their property are holding.

Those who can buy are waiting.

Like scene before the climax in an old Hollywood Western, the California real estate stand-off continues…

Or as Commander Bart Mancuso says in The Hunt for Red October: “The hard part about playing ‘chicken’ is knowing when to flinch.”

Foreclosures Up 57% — REOs Up 100% From March 2007

For the third month in a row, U.S. foreclosure activity registered at more than 50 percent above the level it was at a year ago, according to the March 2008 RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report.

And for the second month in a row, the number of bank repossessions, or REOs, was up more than 100 percent year over year.

RealtyTrac’s latest report shows that foreclosure filings — default notices, auction sale notices and bank repossessions — were reported on 234,685 properties nationwide during the month, a 5 percent increase from the previous month and a 57 percent increase from March 2007.

The report also shows one in every 538 U.S. households received a foreclosure filing during the month.

“The March numbers show that overall foreclosure activity so far this year continues to run nearly 60 percent above the levels we saw last year,” said James J. Saccacio, chief executive officer of RealtyTrac. “On a year-over-year basis, default notices were up nearly 57 percent and bank repossessions were up nearly 129 percent, but auction notices were up only 32 percent, indicating that more defaulting homeowners are simply walking away and deeding their properties back to the foreclosing lender. This deed-in-lieu-of-foreclosure process allows the lender to take possession of a property without putting it up for public foreclosure auction.”

Nevada, California, Florida posted the top state foreclosure rates.

California, Florida, Ohio reported the highest foreclosure totals.

Even more homeowners are expected to go into default and foreclosure in the third and fourth quarters of this year, as the number of adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) resetting to higher rates peaks in May and June.