Tag Archives: Standard and Poor’s

Terrible News Again for Herbst and the Casino Industry

The news is terrible again for Terrible Herbst.

Standard and Poor’s Ratings Services has lowered its rating on Herbst Gaming’s 8.125 percent senior subordinated notes to ‘D’ from ‘C’, following Herbst’s failure to make an interest payment on June 1, 2008.

The bad news for casinos is not limited to Herbst properties.  Bloomberg News reports that “Casino bonds are generating the worst returns for investors as companies from Apollo Management LP’s Harrah’s Entertainment Inc. to Herbst Gaming Inc. risk bankruptcy under the weight of their debt.”

Bloomberg also reports that “Herbst Gaming, operator of 8,400 slot machines in Nevada, stopped paying interest last month, Tropicana Entertainment LLC and Greektown Casino LLC filed for bankruptcy in May and bond prices show Harrah’s and Station Casinos, which piled on more than $25 billion of combined debt in the past year to go private, are also at risk of default.”

The culprit is a deadly trifecta of sharply falling revenues and property values combined with an enormous debt overload.

According to the Nevada Gaming Control Board, casino gambling revenue on the Las Vegas Strip fell 4.8 percent to $517.5 million in March, the third consecutive monthly drop.  Similar losses were experienced in Atlantic City, the second-largest U.S. gambling center, where casino revenue fell 6.7 percent this year through April after a 5.7 percent drop in 2007.

These falling revenues come just when the casinos are committed to paying back tremendous amounts of money that was borrowed when it seemed that the good times would never end.

As Bloomberg reports, the casinos “took on a record debt load before the economy’s latest slowdown. Leon Black’s Apollo, of New York, and Fort Worth, Texas-based TPG Inc. acquired Harrah’s in a leveraged buyout in January for $27 billion.  Station Casinos, owner of 12 Las Vegas-area properties, was taken over for $8.5 billion in November by its management and buyout firm Colony Capital LLC. ‘This would probably be the most leveraged’ the gaming industry has ever been, said Michael Paladino, an analyst at Fitch Ratings in New York. ‘There’s going to be an increase in defaults’.”

“Investors from William Yung, who led Columbia Sussex Corp.’s purchase of Tropicana, to Capital Research & Management Co., the biggest Harrah’s bondholder, are being stung by losses. Debt issued by a group of 10 of the biggest high-yield gaming companies from Las Vegas to Atlantic City and Connecticut will rise to a peak of 6.6 times cash flow this year from 6.5 times in 2007, Deutsche Bank predicts. The total debt for the group will increase to $47 billion from $45 billion.”

When it came to taking on debt, the casinos gambled big.

And this time, the analysts say, the odds are against the house.



Housing Meltdown Continues as Home Prices Fall 14.1 Percent

Despite a slight uptick in the sales of new homes, there is new evidence that the U.S. housing slump will not end anytime soon. 

Yesterday the Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller Index showed that national home prices fell 14.1 percent in the first quarter compared with a year earlier, the lowest since its inception in 1988.

And even though the sales of new homes were up slightly in April, they remained near their lowest levels since 1991.

New home sales were up 3.3 percent from March, but were down a stunning 42 percent from a year ago.

April’s new home sales were the second-lowest since October 1991, behind only March of this year.

The National Association of Realtors, in its typically disingenuous fashion, spins these bleak figures as an “easing” of home sales.

According to the New York Times, “Even markets that once seemed immune to the slump, like Seattle, are weakening. Prices nationwide might fall as much as 10 percent more before a recovery takes hold, economists said. As the home-buying season enters what is traditionally its busiest period, there are simply too many homes in many parts of the country, and too few people with the means to buy them. The situation is likely to get worse because a rising tide of foreclosures is flooding the market with even more homes, while a slack economy and tight mortgage market are reducing the pool of potential buyers.”

Those who can hold on to their properties are not selling at current prices and those who can buy are waiting for prices to fall still lower.

And they will get lower.

With more than 4.5 million homes on the market, and with a rising tide of foreclosures that continues to add dramatically to that figure, prices are certain to continue to fall even further.

There is plenty of money waiting for prices to stabilize, but that won’t happen for quite a while.

First, something must be done to stop the flood of foreclosures that are adding to the nation’s already overloaded housing supply.

Second, the banks and lenders must respond to the Federal Reserve’s lowering of interest rates by passing these lower rates on to more borrowers.

Our guess is that little or nothing will happen on these fronts until after the presidential election.

Meanwhile, the meltdown continues.