Tag Archives: Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson

The Fed Nears the End of the Rate-Cutting Line — Now its the Banks’ Move

After the Federal Reserve cut short-term interest rates on Wednesday for the seventh time since September 2007 — lowering the federal funds rate to 2 percent, from 2.25 percent, the lowest level since November 2004 — most analysts observed that the Fed’s move showed that it was more concerned with preventing recession than halting inflation.

We’re not so sure that it is a question of recession verses inflation that’s driving the Fed.

We think that the Fed’s real concern right now is neither inflation nor recession, at least not directly, but the lack of liquidity in the financial markets and the lack of funds that financial institutions are making available to borrowers.

So far, the Fed has pumped more than $400 billion into major U.S. financial institutions in the hope that these institutions would make this money available to borrowers. 

And, so far, they haven’t done so, and liquidity conditions in the credit markets have continued to deteriorate. 

Despite the Fed’s inceasing generosity for the past six months, it has been harder, not easier, for businesses (and individuals) to borrow money.

The Fed is nearing the end of its rate-cutting line.  If the financial spigot does not loosen for borrowers based on the latest cuts, there may be no more that the Fed can do, especially since, with rising fuel and food prices, fears of inflation are already starting to overtake fears of recession, in America’s living rooms as well as its Board rooms.

Two members of the Fed’s Open Market Commitee  — Richard W. Fisher, president of the Dallas Fed, and Charles I. Plosser, president of the Philadelphia Fed — which is charged under federal law with overseeing national monetary policy — voted against lowering the rates this time.  And the criticism of the Fed’s policy of lowering interest rates and providing cheap money for the banks is getting broader, louder and more influential.

The banks and major lending institutions have been waiting for the Fed to cut interest rates as far as it possibly would before they start lending.

That moment has probably arrived.

Now it’s the financial market’s turn to make a move.

 

 

New Regulation of Credit Industry is Now Inevitable. The Only Question is How Much Regulation, and with How Much Bite?

There can no longer be any question whether there will be new regulation of the credit industry in the wake of the housing meltdown and the mortgage crisis.

The only question now is the extent of the regulation and how much teeth it will have.

Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson eliminated any doubt regarding new regulation when he conceded that the Federal Reserve should bolster its supervision of investment banks while they are taking cheap money from the Fed’s new emergency program.

Paulson said that the Bush administration will soon put forth a blueprint for federal oversight in an effort to promote smoother functioning of financial markets.

”This latest episode has highlighted that the world has changed as has the role of other nonbank financial institutions and the interconnectedness among all financial institutions,” Paulson said.  ”These changes require us all to think more broadly about the regulatory and supervisory framework that is consistent with the promotion and maintenance of financial stability.” 

Greater oversight is necessary, according to Paulson, to “enable the Federal Reserve to protect its balance sheet, and ultimately protect U.S. taxpayers.”

Wall Street’s major investment banking firms, including Goldman Sachs, Lehman Brothers and Morgan Stanley, averaged $32.9 billion in daily borrowing over the past week from the new Fed program, compared with $13.4 billion the previous week. On Wednesday alone, their borrowing from the Fed reached $37 billion.

To add to the growing conservative consensus that greater federal regulation of the credit market is necessary, Wall Street Journal columnist Jon Hilsenrath wrote on the front page of the newspaper’s Money and Investing section that “if the government is going to intervene aggressively when bubbles burst, as it’s doing now, then maybe policy makers should do some new thinking about how to prevent bubbles in the first place.”

Democrats, both in Congress and on the presidential campaign trail, have called for more extensive and permanent regulation of both the credit market and the mortgage industry than that proposed by the Bush administration.

The final outcome will depend on who wins in November and what happens in the economy between now and the next Inauguration Day. 

But it is now clear that one consequence of the Bear Stearns bailout and the Fed’s cheap money policy for the major investment banks is to have made some form of new regulation of the credit market and the mortgage industry inevitable.

In the meantime, we’re still waiting for the enormous sums of cheap money that the Fed has pumped into the credit industry to make its way down the pipeline to the rest of us in the economy.